Saturday, January 30, 2010

Limit Toys.

"Very young children can only truly love one doll, one stuffed animal and a few toys at a time."  -Paula Polk Lillard and Lynn Lillard Jessen, authors of Montessori From The Start

...Children do not distinguish between ritual and reality.  In the world of childhood, toys are ritual objects with powerful meaning and resonance. -Kim John Payne, M.Ed., author of Simplicity Parenting


We are told, often and in so many ways, that this toy and that toy will somehow develop our child's imagination.  If one such toy is beneficial, surely ten more will increase imagination tenfold...Their pitches suggest that our children's imaginations are blank slates waiting for the right, or newest, or most perfect combination, of toys to imprint its magic.  -Kim John Payne, M.Ed., author of Simplicity Parenting


An overemphasis on toys co-opts and commercializes play, making it no longer a child's natural world but rather one that's dependent on adults and the things they provide, to exist.  -Kim John Payne, M.Ed., author of Simplicity Parenting

Ironically, this glut of goods may deprive a child of genuine creativity builder; the gift of their own boredom.  -Kim John Payne, M.Ed., author of Simplicity from the Start


As you decrease the quantity of your child's toys and clutter, you incrase their attention and their capacity for deep play.  -Kim John Payne, M.Ed., author of Simplicity Parenting


If the entire house is cluttered with every sufrace covered, every crannie crammed, then your streamlined, simplified child's room will not last.  Some form of homeostasis among the rooms will develop - either their room will reclutter, or its simplicity will prove your inspiration for decluttering elsewhere.  -Kim John Payne, M.Ed., author of Simplicity Parenting


A half dozen or even a dozen toys may be too few for children beyond eighteen months of age.  -Kim John Payne, M.Ed., author of Simplicity Parenting


A smaller, more manageable quantity of toys invites deeper play and engagement.  An avalanch of toys invites emotional disconnect and a sense of overwhelm.  -Kim John Payne, M.Ed., author of Simplicity Parenting

The profusion of products and playthings is not just a symptom of excess, it can also be a cause of fragmentation and overload.  -Kim John Payne, M.Ed., author of Simplicity Parenting

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