Saturday, January 23, 2010

Give Simple, Learning and Open-Ended Toys.

"Always choose the simplest materials possible for your child's use. One of our goals is to help children understand the world and how it works. Children need to see what is happening with the objects they are using."

"…We must select materials that are structured for the child's independent and repeated practice after the adult has demonstrated their use. They must be real, child-size and arranged in a simple, straightforward and orderly way."  -Paula Polk Lillard and Lynn Lillard Jessen, authors of Montessori From The Start

"Wood is a natural product that the world has always offered and hopefully always will.  Children need these experiences with objects from the living earth.  They serve as reminders of our human responsibilities to the preservation and wise management of the natural world." -Paula Polk Lillard and Lynn Lillard Jessen, authors of Montessori From The Start

[Since the 1950's]...children's play became less focused on activities, and more on the things involved, the toys themselves.  -Kim John Payne, M.Ed., author of Simplicity Parenting

...in play, children use what they can move, and what they can transform with their imagination.  -Kim John Payne, M.Ed., author of Simplicity Parenting

"We want any object that we give to the child under the age of three for independent play to enhance our ultimate goal: connection with others and an understanding of his world. " -Paula Polk Lillard and Lynn Lillard Jessen, authors of Montessori From The Start

If you give a child less and less complexity, they become more interested, and this cultivates true powers of attention.  -Kim John Payne, M.Ed., author of Simplicity Parenting



The primary push in simplifying toys is to reduct the quantity and complexity of your child's playthings.  -Kim John Payne, M.Ed., author of Simplicity Parenting


10-Point Checklist of Toys Without "Staying Power"
1. Broken Toys
2. Developmentally inappropriate toys
3. Conceptually "fixed" toys
4. Toys that "do too much" and break too easily.
5. Very high stimulation toys
6. Annoying or offensive toys
7. Toys that claim to give your child a developmental edge
8. Toys you are pressured to buy
9. Toys that inspire corrosive play
10. Toy multiples
-Kim John Payne, M.Ed., author of Simplicity Parenting
 
Kids don't need many toys to play, or any particular one.  What they need most of all is unstructured play time. -Kim John Payne, M.Ed., author of Simplicity Parenting


Children's play flourishes when we "let it" rather than "make it" happen. -Kim John Payne, M.Ed., author of Simplicity Parenting


A mix of toys should definitely be part of a child's world of play.  It just shouldn't be the overwhelming center. -Kim John Payne, M.Ed., author of Simplicity Parenting

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